A Natural Base

A Natural Base

A client brought a bronze eagle sculpture to us asking for a wooden base to showcase it.   Although she could not define exactly what she wanted, she knew she wanted the base to be very natural and organic.  After some thought, Mark remembered this holly stump he had tucked away.  Selecting the ideal section of the stump to create the base, he cut away the extraneous parts.  After sanding the top and bottom of the base only, he oiled the base to bring out the natural color and give it new life.

 

Come See Us on the Tour!

West Austin Studio Tour - Stop #295

With this promo graphic for the West Austin Studio Tour May 13-14 & May 20-21 (11 am – 6 pm), I feel our landscaping and gardens will be on tour as much as our studio!  The design theme for this year’s Tour is driven by the importance of supporting regional artists and the spaces they live and work in.  Land stewardship is key to a healthy landscape and creativity needs the same stewardship for a healthy artistic ecosystem.  So the graphics for the Tour are focusing on native flowering plants with the goal of celebrating what our community has to offer – both in flora and creativity.

So Landers’ Studio is excited to be on this Tour.  We are artist #295.  You can pick up catalogs and maps at many of the local libraries or go online at http://west.bigmedium.org/.  Hope to see you then!

 

Dell Seton Medical Center at The University of TX

Dell Seton Medical Center at The University of TX

In one of my past blogs, “A Giant Wood Jig Saw Puzzle”, I posted a picture of wood stacked in a kiln for drying and explained that Landers’ Studio had been contracted by Seton (and their sub-contractor J.E. Dunn) to act as a consultant on drying the wood and advising on the best means to ultimately utilize and showcase this wood in the new hospital.  Now Landers’ Studio has been contracted to build liturgical furniture for the chapel using this reclaimed elm and pecan wood.   

One of the featured elements in the chapel furnishings will be the crucifix (shown in this sketch).  Landers will construct the crucifix itself and artist, David Everett, will carve the corpus.  The curved crosspiece of the crucifix will reflect the natural-edged curved stretcher of the altar design (maquette shown in featured image above).  Landers will build the base of the altar and Kincannon Studios will create the limestone altar top.  Landers will also bring in metal artist, John Christensen, to fabricate the candle stands and the tabernacle lamp.  Kathleen Ash, Studio K glass artist, will create the stained glass for the chapel doors, the glass of the tabernacle lamp and the baptismal font.  Landers also invited another woodworker, Mark Macek, to create some of the furniture. 

Landers is now milling and processing the wood in order to create the components of his designs.  For some components, the wood has had to be laminated into thicker stock.  Some of the most showy natural pieces of wood have flaws and cracks that need to be epoxied for strength and beauty.  I will blog again as the components start coming together into liturgical furniture for the new Chapel.

 

Featured in Austin Statesman Homes Magazine

Featured in Austin Statesman Homes Magazine

CUSTOM MILLWORK CAN BE USED TO RE-CREATE LOST DETAILS

by David Wilfong, Special to Statesman Homes, Saturday, January 14, 2017

Sometimes in restoring old homes, or even trying to get period aesthetics right in a new model, replacements for detailed elements can be hard to find. With architectural millwork, most wood accents can be accurately recreated.

Mark Landers of Landers’ Studio (500 W. St. Elmo Rd. in Austin) works on a lot of restorations and keeps his lathe busy recreating stately accents from times gone by.

“Right now we’re turning some balusters for the restoration of an old farmhouse up in Pflugerville,” Landers said. “It’s just not something you can go to a (big box store) and buy. This business is custom, so it’s people who have some idea, or they want to match an old idea.”

Millwork like this can be used for mantels, doors, gingerbread trim, newel posts, balusters, handrails, custom stair parts, porch columns, bull’s-eyes, plinth blocks and a plethora of other architectural accents.

Oftentimes, Landers said, he will work with an original piece to recreate elements if not doing an original design. Sometimes he has to resort to working with old photographs of what was there before a previous renovation.

“The photography is real important,” Landers said. “That’s how I learned my business, from studying old photos of antiques and what not.”

 

Walnut Country Kitchen Table

Walnut Country Kitchen Table

Our latest project was this walnut table top with a painted base and turned legs.  The table was 40 inches x 64-3/4 inches (the perfect golden rectangle) for use as a kitchen table in the client’s home.  First we developed a pattern for the leg and turned the poplar legs on the lathe.  We then quickly assembled the base without glue and only  laid a walnut board on top so the client could come in and approve the table’s design so far.  With this approval, we glued together the walnut boards for the top and glued the base components together.  After much sanding, the walnut top was finished with a pre-catalyzed lacquer and the base was finished in an eggshell white paint chosen by the client.  We applied a final top coat of water clear polyurethane on the paint for durability and ease of clean-up.

 

Capitol Granite Sculptures

Capitol Granite Sculptures

As the granite from the Texas Capitol building develops cracks and water seeps into these cracks and freezes, small pieces of the granite falls off.  These pieces are called spalls and the Texas State Preservation Board collects these spalls and was looking for a way to showcase them and offer these pieces for fundraising purposes.  As with the earlier Capitol oak pieces, TSPB turned to Mark to create sculptures with several of the more interesting spalls and more of the Capitol oak for bases.   The mounted spall pictured here is called “Cardinal” with a copper and red oak burl base.  Mark also created “Capitol Idea” with a brass and red oak base.  And “Sailfish Flying” sits on a copper and red oak burl base.  “Capitol Idea” has already sold even before it had a chance to be displayed.